Tuesday, October 16, 2012

DISCUSSION THEMES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY

Note: The following pairs of related topics will be collapsed into one meeting: #3 and #4; #5 and #6; #7 and #8; #9 and #10; #11 and #12. Scheduled dates for the meetings are indicated in parantheses before each topic. Do not overlook the deadlines (in red) for emailing me your short essays, your final project proposals, and your final projects (i.e., final essays).

1. (17/10/2013) Defining Nationalism - Natio and nation, nation vs. ethnic group, nationalism vs. national sentiment, nationalism vs. (national) ideology, nationalism, nation and state, nationalism: good and bad, nationalism vs. chauvinism/xenophobia, nationalism and history.

Mandatory reading:
•Hutchinson, J. & A.D.Smith, Nationalism, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994, pp. 34-70,76-82, 89-102, 113-131;
•A. Mungiu-Pippidi, Transilvania subiectivă, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 1999, pp. 25-65; (Chapter 2. "Nation and identity in Contemporary Europe" in http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download;jsessionid=DF97A4764F3A6218365B8CDA62591B57?doi=10.1.1.120.6344&rep=rep1&type=pdf, pp. 12-35)

Further reading:
Anderson, B., Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, London New York, Verso, 1990;
•Easthope, A., Englishness and National Culture, Routledge, London, 1999;
•Snyder, L.L., The Dynamics of Nationalism.Readingsin Its Meaning and Development, D.van Nostrand Co.Inc., Princeton etc., 1964;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine. (http://stefanescu-optional.blogspot.com/2009/10/published-in-krytyka-no.html)


2. (24/10/2013) Defining Nationalism - The theories: Romantic-idealist, instrumentalist, contextualist, social-constructivism (“invented” nations) and the typologies. Nationalism as a fuzzy concept or a cluster of properties.

Mandatory reading:
Anderson, B., Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, London New York, Verso, 1990, Introduction and Chapter 3
(http://books.google.com/books?id=4mmoZFtCpuoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=imagined+communities#v=onepage&q=&f=false;

or

http://library.nu/docs/1RXZ5TLH2B/Imagined%20Communities%3A%20Reflections%20on%20the%20Origin%20and%20Spread%20of%20NationalismClick the ifile.it link to the PDF version of the book, then request a download ticket, then download the file;

• Ştefănescu, B., Romanticism Between Forma Mentis And Historical Profile, Ex Ponto, Constanţa, 2000, pp. 84-90;

Further reading:
•Easthope, A., Englishness and National Culture, Routledge, London, 1999;
•Snyder, L.L., The Dynamics of Nationalism. Readings in Its Meaning and Development, D. van Nostrand Co.Inc., Princeton etc., 1964;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


3. (31/10/2013) Nationalism as Discourse: Rhetorical Representations of National Identity - The Performativity of Nationalist Discourse. The tropological types in historical discourse (H. White).

Mandatory reading:
•White, H., Metahistory. The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Europe, The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore & London, 1973, pp. 1-42 (http://books.google.com/books?id=v_DqhVZkQ2EC&printsec=frontcover&dq=metahistory#v=onepage&q=&f=false); orhttp://rapidshare.com/files/237525481/Metahistory.pdf
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine(http://stefanescu-optional.blogspot.com/2009/10/published-in-krytyka-no.html);

Further reading:
•Boia, L., Istorie și mit în conştiinţa românească, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000;
•Girardet, Raoul, Mituri şi mitologii politice, Ed.Institutului european, Bucureşti, 1997;
•White, H., The Tropics of Discourse, The JohnsHopkinsUniversityPress, 1978.


4 (to be collapsed with #3) Nationalism as Discourse: Rhetorical Representations of National Identity- The tropology of nationalist discourse. Rhetorical archetypes.

Mandatory reading:
•White, H., Metahistory. The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Europe, The JohnsHopkins UniversityPress, BaltimoreLondon, 1973, pp. 1-42;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine;

Further reading:
•Marin, N., After the Fall. Rhetoric in the Aftermath of Dissent in Post-communist Times, Peter Lang, 2007;
· Boia, L., Istorie și mit în conştiinţa românească, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000;
•Girardet, R., Mituri şi mitologii politice, Ed.Institutului european, Bucureşti, 1997;
•White, H., The Tropics of Discourse, The JohnsHopkinsUniversityPress, 1978.


5. (7/11/2013) Nationalism as a (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

I. Radicalism - Rhetoric and politics: organizing discourse and collectivities. Political archetypes: Radicalism – the subjective-materialist vision of social life.

Mandatory reading:
•Miller, D., Enciclopedia Blackwell a gîndirii politice, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000, pp. 601-610 - articolele“radicalism”; “radicalii britanici si radicalism filozofic”; (http://rapidshare.com/files/75662004/The_Blackwell_Encyclopaedia_of_Political_Thought.rar- entries for Philosophic Radicalism; Radicalism; Radicals, British - click "Free User" under one of the speedometer clocks;

or

•Heywood, A., Political ideologies. An Introduction, Macmillian Education LTD, 1992, pp. 33-53 and either

•Ingrams, R., England. An Anthology, Fontana, London, 1990, pp. 71-87; or
•Snyder, L., The Dynamics of Nationalism, Nostrand, Princeton, 1964, pp. 2-9, 56-58, 76-103;

Further reading:
•Ball, T. & R. Dagger, Ideologii politice şi idealul democratic, Polirom, Iaşi, 2000;
•Mungiu-Pippidi, A., Doctrine politice. Concepte universale şi realităţi româneşti, Polirom, Iaşi, 1998; (http://www.scribd.com/doc/2588999/-Doctrine-Politice-coord-Alina-MugiuPippidi)
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


6. (to be collapsed with #5) Nationalism as a (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

I. Radicalism-2) Radical versions of national identity in Englandand abroad.

Mandatory reading:
•Miller, D., Enciclopedia Blackwell a gîndirii politice, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000, pp. 601-610; or
•Heywood, A., Political ideologies. An Introduction, Macmillian Education LTD, 1992, pp. 33-53; and either
•Ingrams, R., England. An Anthology, Fontana, London, 1990, pp. 71-87; or
•Snyder, L., The Dynamics of Nationalism, Nostrand, Princeton, 1964, pp. 2-9, 56-58, 76-103;

Further reading:
•Ball, T. & R. Dagger, Ideologii politice şi idealul democratic, Polirom, Iaşi, 2000;
•Mungiu-Pippidi, A., Doctrine politice. Concepte universale şi realităţi româneşti, Polirom, Iaşi, 1998;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


7. (14/11/2013) Nationalism as a (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

II. Liberalism - Liberal Rhetoric and Politics. Political archetypes: Liberalism – the objective-materialist vision of social life.

Mandatory reading:
•Miller, D., Enciclopedia Blackwell a gîndirii politice, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000, pp. 429-438;
•Ball, T. & R. Dagger, Ideologii politice şi idealul democratic, Polirom, Iaşi, 2000, pp. 59-98;

Further reading:
•Heywood, A., Political ideologies. An Introduction, Macmillian Education LTD, 1992, pp. 15-53;
•Mungiu-Pippidi, A., Doctrine politice. Concepte universale şi realităţi româneşti, Polirom, Iaşi, 1998;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.

8. (to be collapsed with #7) Nationalism as a (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

II. Liberalism - Liberal versions of national identity in Englandand abroad.

Mandatory reading:
•Ingrams, R., England. An Anthology, Fontana, London, 1990, pp. 71-87; or
•Snyder, L., The Dynamics of Nationalism, Nostrand, Princeton, 1964, pp. 2-9, 56-58, 76-103, 266-270;

Further reading:
•Ball, T. & R. Dagger, Ideologii politice şi idealul democratic, Polirom, Iaşi, 2000;
•Miller, D., Enciclopedia Blackwell a gîndirii politice, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000;
•Mungiu-Pippidi, A., Doctrine politice. Concepte universale şi realităţi româneşti, Polirom, Iaşi, 1998;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


9. (21/11/2013) Nationalism as (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

III. Anarchism - Anarchist rhetoric and politics. Political archetypes: anarchism - the subjective-idealist vision of social life. The place of anarchism in the 20th century.

Mandatory reading:
•Miller, D., Enciclopedia Blackwell a gîndirii politice, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000, pp. 30-36;
•Heywood, A., Political ideologies. An Introduction, Macmillian Education LTD, 1992, pp. 193-215;

Further reading:
•Ball, T. & R. Dagger, Ideologii politice şi idealul democratic, Polirom, Iaşi, 2000, pp. 31-34, 167-168;
•Mungiu-Pippidi, A., Doctrine politice. Concepte universale şi realităţi româneşti, Polirom, Iaşi, 1998;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


10. (to be collapsed with #9) Nationalism as (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

III. Anarchism - Anarchist versions of national identity in Englandand abroad.

Mandatory reading:
•Ingrams, R., England. An Anthology, Fontana, London, 1990, pp. 71-87; or
•Snyder, L., The Dynamics of Nationalism, Nostrand, Princeton, 1964, pp. 2-9, 56-58, 76-103;

Further reading:
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


11. (28/11/2013) Nationalism as (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

IV. Conservatism - Conservative rhetoric and politics. Political archetypes: conservatism – the objective-idealist vision of social life. The place of conservatism in the 20th century.

Mandatory reading:
•Miller, D., Enciclopedia Blackwell a gîndirii politice, Humanitas, Bucureşti, 2000, pp. 128-134; and either
•Ball, T. & R. Dagger, Ideologii politice şi idealul democratic, Polirom, Iaşi, 2000, pp. 99-124;

Further reading:
•Heywood, A., Political ideologies. An Introduction, Macmillian Education LTD, 1992;
•Mungiu-Pippidi, A., Doctrine politice. Concepte universale şi realităţi româneşti, Polirom, Iaşi, 1998;
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


12. (to be collapsed with #11) Nationalism as (Dis)course of Action: Political Representations of National Identity

IV. Conservatism - Conservative versions of national identity in Englandand abroad.

Mandatory reading:
•Ingrams, R., England. An Anthology, Fontana, London, 1990, pp. 71-87; or
•Snyder, L., The Dynamics of Nationalism, Nostrand, Princeton, 1964, pp. 2-9, 56-58, 76-103;

Further reading:
• Ştefănescu, B., “On the Discrimination of Nationalisms”, in Krytyka no. 11/nov. 1999, Kiew,Ukraine.


13.(5/12/2013 - Deadline for Final Project Proposals and for short presentations/essays to be submitted by email. In-class discussion of proposals.)


14. (12/12/2013) Nationalism and the Politics of Postmodernity (I)

Liberal modernity. Anarchic modernism. Conservative postmodernity. Radical postmodernism.

Mandatory reading:
•Hutchinson, J. & A.D.Smith, Nationalism, OxfordUniversity Press,Oxford, 1994, pp. 287-300, 306-311; and either
•Docherty, Th., Postmodernism. A Reader, Harvester Wheatsheaf, London, 1993, pp. 120-140, 323-363; or
Boyne, R. & A. Rattansi, Postmodernism and Society, pp. 1-70, 97-117;

Further reading:
•Waugh, Patricia, Postmodernism: Reader,LondonNew York, Routledge, 1992;
•Hutcheon, Linda, Politica postmodernismului, Bucuresti, Univers, 1997;


DEADLINE FOR HANDING IN FINAL PROJECTS (VIA E-MAIL): 12/01/2013


14. (16/01/2014) Nationalism and the Politics of Postmodernity (II)

Liberal modernity. Anarchic modernism. Conservative postmodernity. Radical postmodernism.

Mandatory reading:
•Hutchinson, J. & A.D.Smith, Nationalism, OxfordUniversity Press,Oxford, 1994, pp. 287-300, 306-311; and either
•Docherty, Th., Postmodernism. A Reader, Harvester Wheatsheaf, London, 1993, pp. 120-140, 323-363; or
Boyne, R. & A. Rattansi, Postmodernism and Society, pp. 1-70, 97-117;

Further reading:
•Waugh, Patricia, Postmodernism: Reader,London & New York, Routledge, 1992;
•Hutcheon, Linda, Politica postmodernismului, Bucuresti, Univers, 1997.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

COURSE PREREQUISITES

• ATTENDANCE. Attendance is mandatory for at least 1/2 of all actual meetings. Special exemption in writing must be obtained from your MA Program director, or you will not get a pass. Student evaluation will be based, among other criteria, on attendance percentage and in-class participation.

• IN-CLASS REQUIREMENTS. Professorial input for this course will only occasionally involve traditional lecturing; an important part of it will be based on printed material and on moderating in-class discussions, therefore each student’s performance in the meetings is crucial for his/her evaluation.

1. SHORT ESSAY.
All students must hand in a 4-PAGE ESSAY discussing a text from the bibliography (mandatory and further readings).
Additionally, students may volunteer for a 15-MINUTE IN-CLASS PRESENTATION. This means they will have to deliver (not read!) in class the content of their short essay in 15 minutes which will then be discussed in, and by the rest of the class. All presentations must be assisted by hand-outs and/or media material (PowerPoint etc.). The same applies for short essays that are not presented in class: the written essays will be accompanied by a hand-out/media material for a potential presentation. Short essays also featuring as volunteered in-class presentations will receive a 2-point bonus.

2. PARTICIPATION IN DEBATES. Students will also be assessed for their contribution to in-class discussions and debates.

3. CLOSE READING/STUDY OF SEMINAR TEXTS.
All students (not just those on assignment) must read closely the selected test(s) for each seminar. Quizzes should be expected as well as verification of personal reading notes for each seminar. Reading notes for all mandatory readings throughout the semester will be required at the end of the semester as the student's personal portfolio.

• RULES FOR IN-CLASS ASSIGNMENTS.
- Students MUST ENLIST for an assignment (presentation/essay) NO LATER THAN THE SECOND MEETING.
- Failure to DELIVER THE IN-CLASS PRESENTATION AT THE EXACT SCHEDULED TIME will be marked as 0 (nil) and the grade will be compounded with the mark for the written essay.
- Failure to HAND IN THE SHORT ESSAY BY THE ANNOUNCED DEADLINE will attract a deduction of up to 2 points from the mark for the short essay.
- In-class PRESENTATIONS ALSO HAVE TO BE HANDED IN AS 4-PAGE WRITTEN ESSAYS by the general deadline for short essays. (Note that the presentation is no more than the public delivery of the written essay that is required of all students in this course. It is not a different work on a different topic.)
- Failure to COMPLY WITH THE ASSIGNED TOPIC AND METHODOLOGY (see Critical methodology for seminar assignments immediately below) for a presentation/short essay will be marked as 4 (four).

• CRITICAL METHODOLOGY FOR ESSAYS/PRESENTATIONS.
-The theme/topic and scope of each presentation, short essay, and final essay will be NEGOTIATED IN ADVANCE with the course director.
-The THEME AND CRITICAL FRAMEWORK MUST BE CLEARLY STATED both in the actual delivery and in the written form of the presentation. Presentations/essays must also have a FIRM OUTLINE and come as a HEADED ARGUMENT.
-The outline of the argument together with key concepts, quotes, and illustrations should appear in a concise, yet sufficiently clear HANDOUT for teacher and fellow students.
-For presentations and short essays, as well as for in-class debates on the assigned readings, the students are expected to CRITICALLY PROCESS the text they are discussing. This involves, among other things:
-extracting the outline of the main argument in the text,
-rearranging and selecting the ideas of the text in accordance with the student's personal prioritization,
-suggesting points of contention and avenues for debate,
-highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the text, and, just as importantly,
-suggesting how the text could be used to discuss the student's native culture.
- Accepted critical frameworks for all these assignments include rhetoric/discourse studies and the study of political ideologies.

• COMPUTATION OF GRADE.
- Grading IN-CLASS PERFORMANCE will reflect:
1) the assignment (the presentation or short essay) = 33%;
2) participation in the seminar debates = 33%;
3) preparation (close reading and reading notes) and attendance = 33%.

- THE IN-CLASS MARK WILL COUNT AS HALF OF THE OVERALL SCORE, THE OTHER HALF IS THE FINAL ESSAY.

- The student must get a pass IN BOTH MARKS (in-class performance as well as the final essay). A fail in one of the marks automatically triggers a fail in the overall grade.

- Students will not secure a pass for this course unless they have met all these requirements (even for reexaminations):
1. ATTENDANCE [AND COMPENSATING ESSAY(s) WHERE NECESSARY];
2. WRITTEN ESSAY;
3. PORTFOLIO OF READING NOTES FOR AT LEAST 3/4 OF THE MANDATORY BIBLIOGRAPHY;
4. FINAL ESSAY.

• FINAL ESSAY.
The final written assignment is an 8-PAGE CRITICAL ESSAY. In order for the essay to be taken into consideration it must:
a) be based on PRELIMINARY NEGOTIATION of the theme, the approach, the format and the structure of the argument,
b) have a CLEARLY STATED THEME, APPROACH AND STRUCTURE,
c) comply with the STYLE OF AN ACADEMIC CRITICAL ESSAY (references and quotations, cited works/bibliography, notes, editing etc.). This course accepts the MLA STYLE (see http://www.docstyles.com/mlacrib.htm or http://nutsandbolts.washcoll.edu/mla.html ).

- Please note that the theme has to deal with the (construction of a) cultural identity of a (national/ethnic etc.) group and the approach must come from the area of discourse studies (rhetoric, pragmatics, DA/CDA, power and discourse etc.) and/or political/ideology studies. Your best bet would be to select one approach from the bibliography for this course.
Work in the form of personal essay, editorial journalism, historical overview will not be taken into account.

- SUGGESTED FORMAT: a close analysis of a short text (i.e., 2-3 pages, either an integral piece or your selection from a larger work) that proposes/constructs a collective self-image. Do not analyze metatexts that come in the form of critique or interpretation of image-constructing texts, but the image-constructing texts themselves. I am also open to proposals of "texts"  in a broader, post-structuralist or culturalist sense of the term that could include music and the visual arts, products of the media, advertising etc.

- Failure to HAND IN THE FINAL ESSAY BY THE ANNOUNCED DEADLINE will attract a deduction of up to 2 points from the mark for the final essay.

- Any form of PLAGIARISM in this course will automatically result in a FAIL and in the suggestion to the board that the culprit be EXPELLED. Please read http://www.plagiarism.org/ carefully.

MALFUNCTIONS. Please NOTIFY ME IMMEDIATELY should any problems arise regarding either the bibliography and its availability to students or the impossibility to meet a deadline/requirement.  No excuses will be accepted unless a solution has been attempted with me or the BCSC management previously. All other malfunctions should be reported ASAP to the course director or to the BCSC management team.

N.B. One standard page is 2000 characters with spaces/300 words (cf. Tools-Word Count menu in Microsoft Word). Only printed work will be considered for evaluation.